Early Blight Tomatoes and Compost

Early Blight Tomatoes and Compost
Early blight tomatoes and compost. What a combination! This year I was much more successful combating early blight on my tomatoes. I used a lot of compost in the holes at planting time and as mulch around the tomatoes.  Here is a picture of one of my tomato plants.  You can see that it has been attacked by early blight near the bottom but then the top of the plant grew strong without any disease.  This happened to several of my plants.  One plant was almost dead from early blight and then it had a rebirth with lots of new growth and green leaves and now there are tomatoes on it.  This plant in the picture is from a disease resistant heirloom called Mortgage Lifter which you can order from Burpee seed company.

Even the Brandywine Tomatoes Grew

I had quite a few volunteer Sudduth Brandywine tomato volunteers.  Usually I pull out volunteer plants for 2 reasons:

  • they might have disease from the soil
  • they might be a hybrid and not produce a good product

I recognized the very distinctive leaves of the heirloom Brandywine.  Since I hadn’t planted any I nursed these volunteers and have harvested lots of Brandywine tomatoes with still more coming.  One plant did succumb to early blight, though I still got several tomatoes from it.  My other 2 volunteer plants are beautiful–healthy and strong with some early blight at the bottom of the plants.

Early Blight Tomatoes and Compost-Great Success

So based on my experiences this year, I would say that the compost had a very good effect on my soil.  I bought some of the compost from Veterans Compost in Maryland and some I made myself in my Compostumbler and in my wire bin composter.  Read more about Tomato Blight and Compost for a possible scientific explantion.