Monthly Archives: January 2017

Bokashi and Red Composting Worms

I’ve seen a lot on the internet about Bokashi and red composting worms.  Several sites recommend adding Bokashi fermented food scraps directly to the composting worm bin.  That would be much easier than digging holes to bury the Bokashi fermented food scraps.  Usually Bokashi buckets are 5 gallons each.  When it is full that is an awful lot of Bokashi compost to add to a worm bin. Unless you have huge commercial sized worm bins.  So the first problem is the amount of Bokashi when it is ready is too much for a home-sized worm bin.

Bokashi and Red Composting Worms-Is it OK?

Bokashi and red composting wormsAnother problem of putting Bokashi fermented kitchen scraps into a worm bin is that it is very acidic.  Red compost worms also known as red wigglers can tolerate a wide range of ph in the bin.  But they can not handle too much acidity.  When the Bokashi food scraps are first finished they are too acidic for a worm bin.

Posted below is a YouTube video of some Bokashi and red compost worms.  You can see the worms reactions to the acidity of the Bokashi kitchen scraps. It is very clear that they are in distress as they writhe around trying to get away from the acidity.  In the picture to the left the two worms that are curled up are actually writhing in distress to the Bokashi.  The Bokashi is the brown powder that you see in the picture.  The vegetable scraps in the picture are fermented by the Bokashi microorganisms.  I wanted you to know that after I saw the worms’ reactions I removed them from the Bokashi fermented kitchen scraps.

Let Bokashi Compost Sit for a While

it is important to know that Bokashi fermented kitchen scraps need to sit for a while exposed to the air before being added to a worm bin.  Or just add small amounts at a time.  This way the worms can steer clear of it until the acidity has worn off. Bokashi fermented kitchen scraps should not be buried near roots of plants that you care about.  The acidity could harm the roots before it becomes neutral. The acidity dissipates quickly when it is buried in the ground.

Just a Few Tips on Bokashi and Red Wigglers

So these are just a few tips to keep your worms healthy and in the proper environment.  The thing about the Bokashi kitchen scraps is that they are great after they lose their acidity.  The worms really love eating  it after it has a more neutral ph!